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New sailboat technology uses a wing instead of a sail

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Sailing is 7,000 years old, but you've never seen a sail like this. It's designed to reduce our fuel usage and help save the earth.
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The Octopus Inspired Robot

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Adding a soft silicone web to a small robotic octopus helps the machine hit the gas. The first robot shown propels itself by snapping shut rigid plastic legs. The second bot uses flexible silicone legs and moves at about the same speed. The third robot zips along faster, using silicone arms and a web that helps it push through water.

MIT's Robot Cheetah Now Runs Free Without Cables Or a Leash

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MIT researchers have developed an algorithm for bounding that they've successfully implemented in a robotic cheetah.   The key to the bounding algorithm is in programming each of the robot's legs to exert a certain amount of force in the split second during which it hits the ground, in order to maintain a given speed: In general, the faster the desired speed, the more force must be applied to propel the robot forward. In experiments the robot sprinted up to 10 mph and MIT researchers estimate the robot may eventually reach speeds of up to 30 mph.
MIT's robot cheetah might be limited to a top speed of about ten miles per hour in its current form, but its creators based its unique leg mechanisms on an actual cheetah so eventually this robot should achieve some impressive speeds—and jumping capabilities.
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That's a Jetpack For Runners

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This is a backpack jetpack for runner developed by Arizona State University. Called the 4MM because the ultimate goal is to propel a soldier fast enough to run a four-minute mile, the jetpack is being developed by Jason Kerestes with funding from DARPA. The prototype weighs in at eleven pounds which by itself isn't particularly heavy, but in addition to everything else a soldier has to carry it certainly adds up. So the hope is that overall there are still some speed gains when wearing it, and so far in testing it's been found to shave almost 20 seconds off a runner's one-mile dash.
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Lightweight Exoskeleton Lets You Run 10% Easier

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Jason Kerestes is a graduate student at Arizona State University. With support from DARPA, he has developed the AirLegs exoskeleton. It's a small machine worn on the back that decreases the metabolic cost of walking and running by about 10% versus not wearing the machine.
"This device was tested at the Army Research Laboratories in September 2013 and demonstrated a 10% reduction in metabolic cost (compared to no device) for users running at high speeds. It is the only device known to the US Army to oficially augment the human running gait cycle."
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Zoo polar bears will use 'slinky' to warm up elephants

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Underground heating-cooling system will raise bar for energy efficiency
Polar bears like it cool, elephants like it warm and the Oregon Zoo likes it sustainable. Now, zoo construction crews have begun work on a project that will let these two endangered species keep each other's thermostats at comfy levels via an innovative high-tech system buried 12 feet underground.
There's also a "Slinky" involved. It's called a geothermal loop.
Heat is created as a byproduct of cooling the polar bear swimming pools at the zoo. And rather than just expel that heat, the geothermal system will direct it through rows of Slinky-like coiled pipes buried deep in the northern section of Elephant Lands.
The ground maintains a constant temperature, insulating the pipes. Then, when it's time to crank the thermostat, pumps connected to the system will deliver heat to Forest Hall, the 32,000-square-foot indoor portion of Elephant Lands.
The geothermal loop and other energy-efficient design systems are expected to cut Elephant Lands' energy requirements in half, reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 40 percent and serve as the primary heat source for what will be one of the country's largest indoor elephant facilities.
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Astronauts on the ISS look down on our spinning Earth

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Watch along with Expedition 38 crew members Mike Hopkins and Rick Mastracchio as they look at various cities across the globe from the vantage point of the Cupola on-board the International Space Station...
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Two Weeks Under the Sea

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What it's like living two weeks underwater.

Google Introduces Project Wing

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Google has introduces Project Wing, a similar drone delivery program.
"Project Wing is a Google[x] project that is developing a delivery system that uses self-flying vehicles. As part of our research, we built a vehicle and traveled to Queensland, Australia for some test flights. There, we successfully delivered a first aid kit, candy bars, dog treats, and water to a couple of Australian farmers."

This Pair of Bionic Pants Is a Chair That You

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Gear  |  Tech


Image via Noonee
Essentially a pair of mechanical pants that can lock in place, the Chairless Chair acts as a brace that any weary worker can wear at all times, and then simply lock into place and lean on when the opportunity presents itself.
"We are a startup offering you a low cost leg exoskeleton that allows you to sit anywhere - the Chairless Chair. A chair that walks with you."
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SaviOne by Savioke, a robot butler

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The bot is called the SaviOne, a hotel in California introduces first robot butler.
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Self-Assembling origami robot walks on its own

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"Footage from the researchers' laboratory shows a sheet of paper and plastic mounted with batteries and motors that folds itself into a working machine without human intervention and then scuttles out of shot.
The flat-pack robot uses "shape memory polymers" that contract like muscles when they are heated. The robot takes about four minutes to assemble from scratch and can walk at a speed of around 5cm per second.
...the robot could pave the wave for flat-packed machines for use in space or in hazardous environments on Earth where they can be put into confined spaces and left to assemble themselves."
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The Bionic Kangaroo

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Meet the bionic kangaroo, developed by robotics giant Festo to learn from nature for robotics. In this case, the focus is on the kangaroo, from which there is much to be learned with regard to the biomechanics of jumping.
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New Airline Seat Patent, the most uncomfortable plane seats ever

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Last month, Airbus filed a patent for a new kind of airline seat, called a “seating device comprising a forward-foldable backrest.”  A bicycle-like seat to squeeze in more passengers per plane. Its cushions are shaped liked bicycle saddles, and when the seats aren't being used, they fold vertically to save space. The backrest will be a tiny lumbar support. No more tray, which you don’t need because they don’t serve meals on planes anyway.
Airbus openly acknowledges that packing more passengers on board is going to result in reduced comfort, and that the goal is basically to figure out how far they can go without inciting an airborne revolt.
"Reduced comfort remains tolerable for the passengers in as much as the flight lasts only one or a few hours," Airbus sagely calculates, before going on to explain why reducing leg room provides diminishing returns:
"This second solution has also been pursued hitherto," the patent application reads, "and it is difficult to continue to further reduce this distance between the seats because of the increase in the average size of the passengers."
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Real World Third Person Oculus Rift

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The idea is to develop Virtual Reality in a Third Person Perspective view. This wearable can enchance human visual performance for use in real world applications where extended vision benefits the user.
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