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    brilliant streetart found @ mspro’s twitpic
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    By Brooklyn-based illustrator David Park celebrates for Mario's 25th anniversary.
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    By Seattle based photographer Marc von Borstel for Mondetta Performance Gear (MPG), the Fall 2010 collection of MPG.
    "In the first series, the dancers are placed, prisoned, in tiny cell-like boxes that visually constrain and stifle their natural propensity to move freely and engage in dynamic movement. The resulting tension is palpably and viscerally noticeable."
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    Pixel Gameboy
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    SHIELD 4 Vampire Variant Cover by Mike Mayhew.
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    The Homer Simpson Escalator from Gabriel Russo's behance page.
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    By Ann He.
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    Free Chicken Strips!
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    By Hannah(flickr user).
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    "Four Boys" by mieze. Click 2 enlarge!
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    The Pool by Carlos.
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    By Pashandy(flickr user).
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    "Ralph Mosher, an engineer working for General Electric in the 1950s, developed a robotic exoskeleton called Hardiman. The mechanical suit, consisting of powered arms and legs, could give him superhuman strength.
    An arm wrestler’s dream! The General Electric Hardiman was as close as science got to a cyborg during the ’60s; and even then, it was a stretch, since it was worn by its operator rather than grafted onto his body.
    Hardiman was the first serious attempt to build a powered exoskeleton that could multiply the strength of the operator enough to allow him to lift 1500 lbs as if it was a packet of peanuts. General Electric had high hopes for Hardiman; envisioning it being used aboard aircraft carriers for bomb loading, underwater construction, in nuclear power plants, and in outer space, but by 1970 only one arm was actually made to work.
    It could lift 750 lbs and responded according to specs, but the thing weighed in at three quarters of a ton and any attempt to get its legs to work resulted in a fit of mechanical St. Vitus Dance. One arm does not an exoskelton make, so Hardiman faded off into development limbo.

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    The following behaviors are prohibited, Haha!
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    Nice picture, by winzavod(livejournal user).
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    "As it screams through the air at three times the speed of sound, this jet needs to keep the air flowing through the engines down around 500 mph. The solution: a retractable cone plus a series of doors and bypasses. Pilots monitor this system on a sub-panel of indicators (lower left) while making sure they hit specific speeds at precise altitudes during ascent and descent. This Cold War-era spy jet, retired in 1998, also collected intelligence on itself, with a sort of proto-black box that captured 200-plus data points every three seconds. 'If a pilot screwed up, we could download the tapes and say, 'OK, buddy, here’s what you did wrong,' says Rich Graham, a flight instructor and retired SR-71 pilot." Click 2 enlarge!
    Photo: Dan Winters, wired
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    Dancers in Motion by photographer Bill Wadman.
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    Incredible high speed bullet photography by Dutch photographer Alexander Augusteijn. Augusteijn said:
    "I am a photographer from the Netherlands, specializing in high speed photography. I use a normal flash to achieve very short illuminations. The most critical parameter in this kind of photography is timing, which is achieved by computer control of shutter, flash, valve, gun or whatever other device is used.

    These kind of images require a lot of experimentation, dedication, patience and willingness to endlessly clean spill of liquids and debris from objects shot to pieces. Several hundreds of trial shots may be needed to get timing correct. After that, the process is pretty well controlled, and often half of the shots will be usable, with 1 out of 10 really interesting."


    [images credit petapixel, Alexander Augusteijn ]
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    F-22 Double Rainbow by Bernardo Malfitano.
    "An F-22 at Miramar at the top of a loop. He is pulling so many Gs, the low pressure air over the fuselage (that is “sucking” the airplane into the loop) gets cold enough for the water to condense… And the angle is just right for sunlight to undergo total internal refraction and make rainbow colors around the airplane (although I had to under-expose quite a bit for the effect to be visible)."
    The picture won second place in the Museum of Flight photo contest.
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